Experts Reveal to how Create the Perfect In-Home Art Studio

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Maybe the pandemic has you looking for ways to stay creative. Or you’re hoping to utilise unused space in your house. There are many solutions to tackle these problems. However, something not many people consider is installing an in-home art studio.

In-home art studios can be a painting sanctuary, sculpting haven, or a jewelry-making refuge all in one. Depending on the amount of space you have, you might need to adapt to fit your art studio in a small space. All of these complexities might be leaving you wondering where to start, so we asked sculptures, painters, and other artists from Portland, OR to Newark, NJ to share their expert tips on how to create the perfect in-home art studio. Keep reading to see what they had to say.

 

Find a space that blocks out distractions 

An exterior door is essential. Block any interior access to your home. This keeps visitors out of your home while keeping you away from chores and the refrigerator. – Chas Martin 

 

Make sure your in-home studio is well ventilated

In one of my rural in-home art studios, I built an enclosed addition off of my downstairs space out of old reclaimed windows, screens, and doors. I needed additional ventilation so that I could keep my french doors open while I was painting. The structure also provided more storage space and kept the wild animals and bugs out. – Kim Ford Kitz

 

Make your in-home art studio easy to clean

The best decision I made when building my in-home art studio was to include a large stainless steel sink for cleanup. Over the years, the sink has taken on a distinctive patina of various paints, inks, and dyes. This really isn’t the sort of thing you want to do in your kitchen sink, and it was worth the additional expense. – Cassandra Tondro Art  

Bring in natural light

When it comes to setting up an in-home art studio, proper lighting is crucial. Essentially, you can make pretty much any environment work for your artistic endeavours, as long as you have an adequate source of bright, natural light. – Rachel Walter Art

 

Incorporate additional sources of light 

Having a consistent, well-lit room is crucial for colour mixing and artwork creation. ‘Spotlights’ seem like a good idea, although they cause harsh shadows on your work while you paint. After much trial and error, I suggest that you install nondirectional LED lights of 5000K daylight temperature, with a direct current to stop any flickering. – Bella’s Art Studio

 

Keep your floors spotless

As you grow in the ways you create and promote your art, the best in-home art studio is one with easy-to-clean floors. Put all of your storage, staging tables, and shelving on wheels so you can rearrange things as needed. When possible, install a dedicated electrical circuit so you have the flexibility for portable lighting, computer, framing, shipping, and desktop options. – Deb K Art

 

Moveable is a must

Movable work tables are a huge benefit to an in-home art studio. They can be configured in a big table for huge mass productions or in a circle to surround me when I need to spread out layouts. – Mays Mayhew 

 

Rolling storage that houses the different mediums the artist’s work is in is important because it can be stored out of sight in a closet or moved to the area you are working. Most artists work in different mediums and this way the supplies are kept separate and easily seen. – Deborah Ellington

 

You don’t need high-end fixtures

It’s important to be able to make a mess while creating. Don’t invest in high-end studio furniture, especially if it has other uses in your home. Think less expensive, minimal, multi functioning, and not precious. – Dana Mooney Art

 

Embrace storage

 Be sure to include plenty of storage for completed works and studies. Built-in artwork storage is crucial for keeping your art safe and for making space for you to stay focused on making more art. – Emily Grace King

 

Embrace vertical storage. Having shelves above your workspace with supplies and tools that you don’t use as frequently can clear up a lot of space and prevent storage cabinets from overflowing. – Amy Reader

 

Create a one-stop-shop for your tools

Give your most beloved tools a dedicated zone where they are set up, ready for use, and free of clutter. Keep everything you need to use them within reach of that zone so you can sit down and get into the zone. – Corey Egan

 

Install a corkboard for inspiration

My favourite feature in my art studio is an 8×8 foot white cork wall. I can work on it, use it as a gallery wall, or use it as a giant mood and inspiration board. – Leslie Goldman, Wild Cherry Art

 

Try different products to save space

By foregoing pre-stretched canvas in favour of un-stretched canvas, you’ll get a ton more floor space and reduce your material cost. For one thing, you don’t need as many easels. You can pin your work directly to the wall and have many pieces on-the-go at once. – Paws By Zann

 

Repurpose items for your home studio

 I use old glass jars to keep my pens, pencils, and paintbrushes in, and my desk is made out of reclaimed scaffold boards on two trestle stands. It saves them from going to the landfill and gives my desk area a lovely rustic feel.” – Eastern Sapphire Designs

 

Studio safety is important

 Proper disposal of art materials and studio safety is vital. Collect all water used to clean your brushes in a container and drop that off at your local hazardous waste facility, dispose of oily rags or dried oil paints in an oily waste can, and be sure to have proper air filtration if you are working with dust or solvents. – Amanda Lee Jones

 

Keep items that inspire close by

 Find a corner or a section of wall space for a few shelves to create what I call an “altar of inspiration.” For my altar, I like to place pictures of artists and people who inspire me and my meditation beads. Other ideas could be special mementos that remind you of happy memories as an artist like your first paintbrush or low-maintenance plants like succulents to usher in positive creative energy. – Mini but Mighty Art

 

Design an in-home art studio where you can watch your art grow

 Imagine a piece of art that you would be really proud to make in the next 3 to 5 years. How can your in-home art studio space support this kind of work? Do you need a blank wall to showcase large pieces? If you build the studio with your dreams in mind, you will be more successful in reaching them. – Gabrielle AbbottIn Home Art Studio

Originally published on Redfin.com

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